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This past weekend we went to Bath for a weekend away with friends.  On Saturday morning whilst I was waiting for Mr Rigg to arrive by train, I ventured in to the Bath Farmer’s Market – and what treats awaited me!

Incredible veggies – like these pink stripey beetroot and mixed carrots.  I bought a bunch of each.

Wonderful cured meats and sausages – bottom right is pancetta and Coppa, both of which found their way into my shopping bag, along with some Italian pinwheel sausages (back top left). 

Mushrooms of all kinds – I bought a box of those teeny tiny ‘Paris Browns’.

Cheeses of all kinds, including the award winning Bath Soft Cheese – somewhere between a Brie and a Camembert.

This is the lovely oil man, selling rapeseed oil made from his farm’s crops, and also making a selection of delicious dressings.  I usually make all my own salad dressings, but I couldn’t resist a bottle of his creamy Quince and Cider dressing.

The quince lady…well that’s not her real name (a bit more on her soon) selling a selection of beautiful homemade quince products.  Syrups, jellies, sweets and quince paste.

The choice of vegetables available at the farmer’s markets is outstanding.  All farmers markets around the country should have this kind of choice.  Everyone around the country should have access to vegetables like these.  Dark bunches of cavolo nero and pumpkins of all sizes and colours.

The aforementioned flowerpot bread – cheese and herb I think, baked in a terracotta flowerpot to give it that unusual shape.  Also deliciously tasty!

If you ever thought winter vegetables could be boring, here’s a picture to change your mind – amber pumpkins, pinky-purple onions, muddy carrots, fat beetroot, stalks of sprouts, bundles of spinach, dark curly kale, crisp stalks of celery, fresh broccoli, and the wrinkly savoy cabbage or those tinged violet.

And this stall selling their own cheeses, and various cheese products and accompaniments – chutney, cheesecake, soft cheese, and curd tarts.  I bought some of their ewes cheese which was incredibly delicious.

Our pre-dinner nibble – cheese and herb flowerpot bread (from Bath farmer’s market – more on that to come!), Mrs Kirkham’s crumbly Lancashire cheese, and Killerton Estate apple chutney.

Scrummy.

I’m not doing very well at keeping up with … well … updating!  There’s so much I want to share and yet I must find more time!  And so many promised posts and recipes … I haven’t even finished off my food memories of Italy (part 1 and 2), and that was last September!

Note to self: must try harder.

On a jollier note, we had a scrumptious and so SO simple tea of roasted summer vegetables.  This is my idea of cooking, of eating, of tasting.  And what a Nigel Slater way to eat dinner – just a plate of roasted vegetables and some hunks of good bread to mop up the juices.

In my pan of delicious roasted vegetables were the following: baby orange peppers, red pepper, yellow cherry tomatoes, red baby plum tomatoes and homegrown yellow courgette.  All cut into similar sized chunks, drizzled with good olive oil and roasted. 

The added extra that make this dish really simple were liberal dollops of sundried tomato paste, hunks of buffalo mozzarella, finely chopped garlic, a sprinkling of dried herbs, and some good old fashioned seasoning (salt and pepper). 

I also whizzed up lots of fresh basil, extra virgin olive oil, and a good handful of grated Parmesan which was drizzled over everything towards the end of the cooking, and extra served fresh.

All this was munched up with gorgeous foccacia bread from Jane’s Handmade Bread – bought that morning at Abbey Leys Farmer’s Market.

You can’t get better than that!

Today we have been busy at the allotment enjoying this fabulous heatwave.  Covered in suncream we got about moving the ‘shed’ (it’s more storage than shed) forward about a foot so that we can get to the raspberries more easily.

Then we built a compost bin from old gates and a pallet.  We feel like proper allotment owners now.

Here’s the before…

And the after…

We stopped lots to eat delicious chunks of frosting coated chocolate brownie cake.

At lunch we sat on the grass in the shade of the car and devoured hunks of bread smeared with gooey camembert.

We cleared a sizeable patch of the allotment which I’m planning on turning into a herb garden with a small patch of grass where we can sit and picnic during the summer.

Then we filled out new compost bin with bits we had dug up and a well-rotted heap of rabbit droppings.

Our day finished with the first barbeque of the year and dinner outside. 

Sausages (from Little Heath Farm), lettuce, cherry tomatoes with basil and Parmesan, and bread.

It’s been one of the nicest, most relaxing and productive days we’ve had in a long time.  Rosy cheeks all round.

Smoked Salmon

Welcome back and a Happy New Year to you!  N and I have just returned from a weekend with my family, which has been lovely, although it is much quieter now we’re back home…

I haven’t taken many foodie photos over Christmas, to be honest I haven’t enjoyed food much over the festive period as I’ve had a grotty cold for two weeks.  How miserable! 

My taste buds went completely and I couldn’t taste anything – I felt like eating bread and butter as it didn’t make much of a difference what I ate as it was only to fill my belly.

Smoked Salmon

That being said, we have enjoyed some delicious smoked salmon, and a gift of some oak smoked salmon was particularly good – I could actually taste it! 

Our favourite way to eat smoked salmon is on thinly sliced bread with a good smear of butter, lots of freshly ground black pepper (for me) and a good squeeze of lemon. 

Smoked Salmon

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Two summers ago we went to Sweden for a family wedding.  We decided to make it into our summer holiday as it seemed like a long way to go for a wedding.  We travelled by boat to Denmark with our little car, then drove around a large part of the west coast of Sweden.  At the time, it felt exhausting, and by the time we got back we weren’t sure it had felt much like a holiday.

Now as I look back on our time there and the experiences we had, it was actually quite a lovely holiday.  Despite the terrible weather and the hours and hours of driving, we ate some lovely food and saw some fantastic things.  It is an amazing country and somewhere I would definitely like to return to one day.

We sailed from Harwich to Esbjerg in Denmark, then drove along the E20 through Denmark to Copenhagen.  We crossed the huge bridge from Copenhagen to Malmo – our first stop in Sweden.  Our parks conference the February before we went away had included a speaker from Malmo, and it inspired me so much I knew we had to visit. 

the bridge from Copenhagen to Malmo

the bridge from Copenhagen to Malmo

Everywhere that we stayed on our journey along the coast was a member of the Bo på lantgård – ‘staying on a farm’ – http://www.bopalantgard.org.  Our first farm was Vragerups Gård (http://www.vragerup.se/) in the countryside outside Malmo.  It was an idyllic farmhouse with beautiful furnishings and we really didn’t want to leave. 

Vragerups Gard, near Lund

Vragerups Gard, near Lund

In terms of eating out our plan was to drive around and see what looked nice, which means on one hand you might find a real gem of a restaurant, but on the other hand it could be dire.  Our first night we found this place…

Kallbadhus in Bjarred

Kallbadhus in Bjarred

It couldn’t have been a more stunning location, and the food was equally nice.  I have managed to find out that the restaurant is called Kallbadhus (this might be the name of the whole complex) or Kalendarium, but it is also Sweden’s longest swimming pier (http://www.kallbadhus.se/).

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Nearby to where we were staying, we discovered this unusual village, which we think it styled on a medieval style town.  It felt like a film set, especially as it was seemingly deserted.

unsual medieval style town

unusual medieval style town

We had a somewhat miserable day out in Malmo as it rained, and rained and rained.  So much for visiting parks – we ended up on a coach tour of the city, which was not quite what we were hoping, but there wasn’t much choice short of getting soaked.  We did also discover a cluster of craft workshops and a quaint sweet shop – perfect for gifts for younger brothers!

 

Malmo before the rain

Malmo before the rain

Our plan the next day, with storm clouds looming, was to head for the sun and blue clouds wherever they were on the horizon.  This worked out quite well, and we came across a little cafe-cum-farm shop.  We sat in a beautiful glasshouse and ate tea and cake under a canopy of kiwi fruit!

canopy of kiwis

canopy of kiwis

That evening, we found a lovely little restaurant in a nearby town and enjoyed a great meal.  That was until the roof above me sprung a leak, which turned into a waterfall, and the whole restaurant was swamped!  We sat in the car wondering what kind of holiday we were on…

rain rain go away

rain rain go away

One thing that Swedish hospitality does well is a fantastic spread for breakfast: cooked meats, jams, compotes, fresh fruit, yoghurt, cheeses, and breads including the dark rye breads.  I fell in love with what I like to call pillow bread, what it’s real name is I’m not sure – but it’s soft, flat, with dimples in it like a sofa.  I ate a lot of it during this holiday, and brought a lot back with us. 

breakfast at Vragerups Gard

breakfast at Vragerups Gard

As we travelled up the coast and slightly inland to our next stop – an incredible looking colonial style house – there was more rain…

rain

rain

Drip, drip, drip, little april showers…

and more rain

and yet more rain

We started to see signs for a vaffle stuga (spelling probably not quite correct) and ended up in a log cabin deep in a huge forest eating waffles!  They were delicious and it was nice to sit inside by a fire while it drizzled outside.  There was a hamlet of houses selling artisan made items and we came away with a lovely rug that now sits in our living room.

the waffle house

the waffle house

Hults Gard (http://www.hultsgard.com/) the next place we stayed, looked beautiful, but our room was small and felt like we were staying in a hostel.  One of the things I enjoyed most about the incredible amounts of driving that we did, was it meant we could watch the landscape change – from the rolling farmland and towns near Malmo, to dark evergreen forests, then through great expanses of farmland with railroads, and finally to the rocky coastal islands with their clapboard fishing villages.

 

Hults Gard

Hults Gard

The wedding was held in a fairytale castle near Gothenburg and was a whole weekend of eating and celebrating.  We were treated to a gourmet meal featuring some delicious Swedish dishes – sadly no pictures.

the wedding castle, near Gothenburg

the wedding castle, near Gothenburg

Our final leg of the journey took us further up the coast and out onto an island.  We were staying at a strawberry farm called Tyfta Ostergård (http://www.lekander.nu/eindex.html) which had the perks of fantastic jams and compotes for breakfast. 

Tyfta Ostergard - the strawberry farm

Tyfta Ostergard - the strawberry farm

It was run by a lovely family with three generations of the family living and working there together.  The guest accommodation including a lovely kitchen and sitting room were decorated with that impeccable Swedish knack for style.

effortless Swedish style at Tyfta Ostergard

effortless Swedish style at Tyfta Ostergard

It was out on these islands that we had our best meals of the holiday.  It was also probably the poshest and most expensive meal that we have ever eaten – but worth every penny.  Situated on the “herring island” of Klädesholmen is Salt & Sill (http://www.saltosill.se), a small restaurant with a stunning view and excellent food. 

the view from our table at Salt & Sill

the view from our table at Salt & Sill

The highlights of this meal by far were the starters.  I wish at the time I had written down exactly what we had eaten, because now I just have the photos as a reminder, but don’t know any of the more interesting details!

Salt & Sill restaurant, Kladesholmen

Salt & Sill restaurant, Kladesholmen

N had a trio of pickled herring, each piece pickled differently, on a different bread or cracker, topped with a different sauce.  Each mouthful was pared with a different shot of snaps. 

trio of herring and snaps

trio of herring and snaps

I chose salmon, which turned out to be THE best salmon dish I’ve ever eaten.  I think that salmon dishes often run the risk of being a bit boring, but this was incredible.  I think it was poached somehow – it was so delicate, and still so pink, and came on a bed of green vegetables with a sauce that I think was broad bean.

THE best salmon

THE best salmon

For mains we had fishcakes and a piece of cod with a foam – sorry I can’t recall the details more accurately.

main courses at Salt & Sill

main courses at Salt & Sill

Desserts were also a highlight.  N had a(nother) trio of handmade truffles with a strawberry coulis. 

trio of handmade truffles

trio of handmade truffles

I had a delicate dish which comprised a miniature panna cotta dusted with vanilla, a chocolate fondue sauce, and a caramelised banana wrapped in filo pastry and finished with a scattering of nuts.  This restaurant would come highly recommended from me to anyone looking to visit this part of Sweden.  It’s not to be missed.

my dessert

my dessert

The island of Tjörn had a wealth of interesting places for ‘foodies’ to visit.  We found a pick-you-own tomato farm!

just a few of the tomato varieties at the pick-your-own farm

just a few of the tomato varieties at the pick-your-own farm

It was run by a lovely couple who showed us around their giant pollytunnel where there were growing unusual organic salads.  I have never seen or heard of some of the incredible vegetables, salads and herbs they were growing, so it was a fantastic experience.  Ever since this experience, I have always loved the idea of setting up a pick-you-own tomatoes, what a fab idea!

salads, herbs and cucumbers

salads, herbs and cucumbers

There was one cafe that I had read about on my internet searches before we left for Sweden that I was determined we would visit.  It is a small cafe-restaurant in the fishing village of Mollösund, which is right on the far tip of an island called Orust.  Café Emma (http://www.cafeemma.com/eng.html) is  a member of the Slow Food movement, and serve homemade food using seasonal and local ingredients. 

Cafe Emma in Mollosund harbour

Cafe Emma in Mollosund harbour

We both had their signature rich fish soup for starters, which is made with saffron, shrimp and two kind of fish.  It was served with bread, aioli and a herb mayonnaise.  I must admit this isn’t the sort of starter I would normally order, but it was incredible. 

fish soup with aioli at Cafe Emma in Mollosund

fish soup with aioli at Cafe Emma in Mollosund

It was a no-brainerwhat N would choose for his main – a homemade burger.  It was served in thin pillow bread, with a fresh tomato salsa and a bean salad.  Who said burgers have to be unhealthy?

homemade beefburger

homemade beefburger

I chose a quinoa salad with asparagus, baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, olives, roasted beetroot and micro salad leaves.  This is food to die for.

quinoa salad

quinoa salad

Café Emma serve the kind of food that you never forget.  Food that you dream about.  Food that you spend hours trying to recreate.  These are my food memories.

Winter veg coleslaw

Winter veg coleslaw

For lunch today, I finally made the coleslaw I’ve been wanting to make for the last two weeks.  The two cabbage that I bought, were however bought two weeks ago when I first decided I wanted to try making coleslaw.  I’d stored them in our back porch – which is somewhere between a shabby conservatory, a lean-to, and a boot room – as it’s freezing in there and great when I run out of fridge space.  They probably weren’t as crisp and crunchy as they would have been two weeks ago, but notheless still good.

I finely shredded a small white cabbage and a small red cabbage.  Finely sliced a small red onion, and grated half a giant carrot – probably the size of one normal carrot.  In a bowl I combined a couple of tablespoons of organic mayonnaise, about two teaspoons of whole grain mustard, a little under one teaspoon of Dijon mustard, a glug of extra virgin olive oil, a splash of white wine vinegar, salt, pepper and a little warm water.  I mixed this all together and added my shredded, sliced and grated veg.  Stir it altogether and you have my version of coleslaw. 

a hearty meal

a hearty meal

What I’ve realised is that you don’t need to think that you need to ‘attempt’ to make coleslaw.  It is in fact, quite simple.  I’m sure you could try lots of different combinations, and with a little bit of tweaking to create the flavours you’re after it would still taste great.  So have a go, it’s the perfect way to eat raw vegetables at this cold and inhospitable time of year.

We ate ours two ways: N served his coleslaw with a minute steak (from Little Heath Farm) and a hunk of Cheese and Sundried Tomato bread (from Barkbakan – this bread is delicious, it is topped with mixture of seeds, one of which is caraway which seems to have the effect of hightening the cheese and tomato flavours); I ate mine with a potato, cheese and leek pastry.

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Eat the Earth

I love food, especially locally grown and seasonal food. This is my place to share my food finds and the food I like to eat.

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All pictures are my own unless stated. I would kindly ask that you don't use them elsewhere unless you ask permission first. Many thanks x

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